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Even long after having dropped its blooms, the Columbine’s withering leaves keep looking attractive.


Even long after having dropped its blooms, the Columbine’s withering leaves keep looking attractive.


Even long after having dropped its blooms, the Columbine’s withering leaves keep looking attractive.


My Windflowers, also known as Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis), are just about to bloom.


Close-up of a blooming Caprifolium, perhaps better known as Honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium), captured in a neighbouring garden.


Close-up of a budding Caprifolium, perhaps better known as Honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium), captured in a neighbouring garden.


A blooming Chihuahua Flower (Tacitus bellus), a Succulent originating from Mexico.


Withering Poppy seed capsules, just waiting for the wind to do the final job of spreading the seeds.


Close-up of the seed capsule of an Oriental Poppy, captured shortly after the petals had dropped off.


Not all Poppies are plain red.


An Oriental Poppy gently swaying in the evening breeze.


A group of huge Oriental Poppies in full bloom.


A huge Oriental Poppy bud just about to burst open.


A huge Oriental Poppy bud just about to burst open.


Oriental Poppy buds captured in the early morning light.


Oddly, I’ve noticed that some of my withered Columbines have 10 seed tubes instead of the normal five.


Another Columbine variant (Aquilegia vulgaris) captured in my backyard.


Another Columbine variant (Aquilegia vulgaris) captured in my backyard.


A white Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris) captured in my backyard on a grey and overcast day.


Another Columbine variant (Aquilegia vulgaris) captured in my backyard.


A beautiful pastel-shaded Columbine captured in the soft evening light.


Another little beauty captured in my backyard.


Another Columbine variant (Aquilegia vulgaris) captured in my backyard.


Close-up of a dark purple Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris) captured in the soft evening light.


The first Columbines (Aquilegia Vulgaris) have just started to shoot 🙂


Watched in awe for a couple of hours this huge Poppy (Papaver orientale) slowly unfolding.


Close-up of a huge Poppy bud belonging to a species called Beauty of Livermere (Papaver orientale), I believe.


Some huge Poppy buds belonging to a species called Beauty of Livermere (Papaver orientale), I believe.


Some huge Poppy buds are emerging in my backyard these days. I believe they are called Beauty of Livermere (Papaver orientale).


The Poppy season seems to start a little earlier this year.


The characteristic shape of a sprouting Hemp plant (Cannabis sativa), captured in my ‘wild corner’.


A blooming Grass Lily or Star of Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) captured in my backyard. They tend to hide in the tall grass; hence the title.


A sprouting pinkish Houseleek captured in my rock bed with a 105mm macro lens + 36mm extension tube.


A close-up shot of a budding Coral Carpet, also known as White Stonecrop (Sedum album).


A close-up view of the Coral Carpet (Sedum album) that’s covering a large part of my rock bed.


A patch of common Moss shooting up its small seed capsules.


My Houseleeks are slowly coming to life after their long winter lair.


Finally my Apple trees are in full blossom too. Taken shortly after an afternoon shower.


Finally my Cherry trees are blooming once again.


Finally my Cherry trees are in full blossom. What a delightful sight 🙂


As I had two almost identical shots of this Tulip, I decided to play with the Radial Blur filter on this one.


A small group of my favourite Crocuses about to open up.


I’ve been following this little group of Crocuses ever since they started to pop up, but the blooms never opened fully up. A couple of days after I took this picture, they were all gone. Perhaps they didn’t like the unusual mild Winter we’ve had this year…


Keeping a watchful eye on this little group of Crocuses to follow their progression.


A solitary Snowdrop slowly opening up in the warm and soft morning light.


Some Rose Hips I captured in a neighbouring front yard this morning.


Still plenty of berries (haws) left on the Hawthorn trees, but most of them will drop off as soon as the first frost arrives.


Yet another wet and dreary November day, but at least the sun was out for a short while this afternoon.


Rain droplets hanging from the black berries of my Privet hedge.


Not in perfect symmetry, but this withered Fern leaf reminded me of the Double-Helix Structure of DNA.


Found this large specimen growing in my backyard. I believe it’s a Penny Bun, also known as King Mushroom (Boletus edulis).


Found this little group of Velvet Foot Mushrooms (Flammulina velutipes) growing on an old Elder tree in our local forest.


Went back to the Chanterelles (Cantharellus cibarius) once more as the light was a little better today.


Found this group of Chanterelles (Cantharellus cibarius) in the local forest.


A group of Cortinarius, I believe, but please correct me if you know better.


Found this large Thorn bush in a local park with clusters of red berries (Haws) hanging down from each and every branch.


Always a pleasure to find some of the colourful Dog Roses (Rosa gallica) this time of the year.


Fall Mums belong to the Chrysanthemum family. Captured these beauties in a neighbouring garden.


These Poppies have now completed their life circle and made sure there will be plenty of new ones again next year 🙂


The calendar may say Autumn, but that doesn’t prevent the plants in my ‘wild corner’ from keep on blooming as they have done all Summer.


Close-up of a Moroccan Toadflax, also known as Baby Snapdragon and Spurred Snapdragon (Linaria maroccana), captured in my backyard.


A Californian Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) glowing in the evening light.


A little late Sunflower captured in my backyard.


A small Sunflower bud well on its way to glory.


Still a few Poppies left in my backyard 🙂


A blooming Windflower, also known as the Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis), captured in my backyard.


A group of Windflowers, also known as Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis), gently swaying in the evening breeze.


Close-up of a plant known by several names, including: Love-in-a-Mist, Ragged Lady, Devil in the Bush and Persian Jewel (Nigella damascena).


Close-up of a plant known by several names, including: Love-in-a-Mist, Ragged Lady, Devil in the Bush and Persian Jewel (Nigella damascena).


A hungry Peacock Butterfly (Nymphalis io) feeding on the sweet nectar of a Starflower.


Spotted this little beauty in the undergrowth of my wild corner. I believe it’s a Crimson Clover (Trifolium incarnatum).


Blueweed, also known as Viper’s Bugloss (Echium vulgare). The flower buds are pinkish and gradually turn blue when fully opened.


The Borage or Starflower (Borago officinalis) is a fascinating plant to observe through all its stages.


A small Hoverfly verifying the authenticity of a blooming Oriental Poppy.


Another Oriental Poppy just opened up this morning. Below is how it looked like an hour earlier.


You’ve got to be up early in the morning to see the budding Poppies, but I think it’s well worth the effort.


An Oriental Poppy bathing in the late afternoon light.


Another Giant Poppy has emerged in my backyard, albeit a little smaller than the first one as it only measures 15 centimetres (6 inches) across.


A close-up shot of my giant Poppy, taken just in time before a heavy rainfall knocked off all its petals.


Just a simple shot of a huge Poppy, which I believe is an Oriental Poppy ‘Beauty of Livermere’ (Papaver orientale).


The Poppy season is in full swing now 🙂


You’ve got to be up early in the morning to see the budding Poppies, but I think it’s well worth the effort.


I haven’t yet figured out how to shoot Foxgloves in a more interesting or creative way, but at least I think this attempt turned out reasonably well.


A pastel shaded Columbine captured in the wild corner of my backyard.


The first of my Columbines to bloom was this mutant or hybrid which I haven’t seen before.


A white Columbine captured in my backyard on a grey and overcast day.


This little Columbine had a rather wet experience on its very first day.


The incredibly intense colours of the Gazania flowers almost have a psychedelic effect when they open up and reveal all their beauty.


Gazania flowers only open up when the sun is out.


A group of blooming Mossy Saxifrages (Saxifraga x arendsii) captured in the soft evening light.


A Tulip in my backyard just about to open up.


Slowly but surely, the bloom buds on my Crown Imperial (Fritillaria imperialis) are opening up.


The bright blooming Cheery trees keep amazing me every Spring.


An interesting new wildflower has shown up in my front yard this Spring. A Siberian Bugloss or Heartleaf Brunnera (Brunnera macrophylla).


This little beauty, a Glory-of-the-Snow (Chionodoxa), growing in the middle of my lawn.


A close-up of a blooming Lenten Rose (Helleborus orientalis), captured in my backyard.


A group of yellow Crocuses coming to life in the afternoon sun.


A small group of violet Crocuses started to open up when the afternoon sun came out.


A small group of violet Crocuses started to open up when the afternoon sun came out.


A Spring Snowflake (Leucojum vernum), one of the many Snowdrop variants popping up in my backyard these days.


Winter Aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) are popping up everywhere these days. Such a delightful sight 🙂


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